Mcwh Rejects Monash University Study: Bmi Should Not Influence Immigration

< BACK TO IMMIGRATION starstarstarstarstar   Government - Immigration Press Release
20th October 2010, 06:04pm - Views: 731





Misc Miscellaneous MCWH 1 image

Misc Miscellaneous MCWH 2 image

Misc Miscellaneous MCWH 3 image

Misc Miscellaneous MCWH 4 image

Suite 207, Level 2, 134 Cambridge Street, Collingwood Victoria 3066  Tel: 03 9418 0999  Fax: 03 9417 7877

Awarded for Excellence in Service Delivery to the Multicultural Community in Victoria


 


Media Release

Wednesday 20th October 2010


MCWH rejects Monash University study’s recommendations to limit

immigration based on body mass index and assumed strain on health system

Multicultural Centre for Women’s Health today lashed out at a Monash University

study that suggests that targeted preventative health policies are not effective, and

that immigration policies may be influenced by their study. 

The article, BMI differences in 1st and 2nd generation immigrants of Asian and

European origin to Australia by Katharina Hauck, Bruce Hollingsworth and Lawrie

Morgan states “recent South European immigrants may place greater strain on health

resources due to their higher BMI. Thus, increasing rates of immigration from South

European countries may have significant effects on health care costs.”

Executive Director of MCWH Dr Adele Murdolo said the report drew disturbing and

tangential connections from the health of immigrant subgroups to immigration policy

itself, suggesting that to avoid strain on the health system, the Government should

‘choose’ immigrants from areas less likely to have a higher BMI.

“Whilst it is true that some immigrant populations are overrepresented in ill-health in

Australia, that is no reason to engage in selective immigration policy; it is rather about

investing in the appropriate early intervention and prevention policies that assist the

health and wellbeing of all Australians, regardless of their birthplace or ethnic origin.

“When migrants come into Australia, they must pass an array of strict health checks

and are only allowed entry if they are at optimum levels of health. 

But after arriving in Australia, overseas born people are registering proportionally

higher rates of illnesses such as diabetes and obesity.

“The problem is one of access. Good health care and preventative health care is not

shared equally across Australia.  If health care services are accessed, it’s usually at

crisis point. 

“Hospitalisations rates for diabetes among people born in South East Europe, Africa

and the Middle East are 10% higher than among Australian born and death rates from

type 2 diabetes are 20% higher.

“There is inadequate funding for education and prevention programs aimed at

migrants and refugees in order to address the spiralling incidence of diabetes.

“We know that education and early intervention is the best solution for this problem.

But studies such as this one are extremely dangerous if they create ramifications on

policy and reinforce racial stereotypes.

Suite 207, Level 2, 134 Cambridge Street, Collingwood Victoria 3066  Tel: 03 9418 0999  Fax: 03 9417 7877

Awarded for Excellence in Service Delivery to the Multicultural Community in Victoria


“We call on the government to improve access to services for refugees and migrants

and increase bilingual health and education programs specifically tailored to these

communities, rather than selecting immigration from countries with lower BMI’s as

the Monash Study quite openly suggests” said Dr Murdolo.

For more information or to arrange an interview, contact

MCWH spokesperson Dr Adele Murdolo: 0438 823 299

Anaya Latter, Media: 0432 121 636







news articles logo NEWS ARTICLES
Contact News Articles |Remove this article